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Located on the central coast of British Columbia’s picturesque Vancouver Island, Nanaimo is an oceanside gem. The Harbour City has endless opportunities for hiking, paddling, and diving, along with a growing offering of places to sip and dine. 

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Nanaimo is the hub of Vancouver Island and is a launch point to all the amazing things that the Island has to offer. From hiking to a rainforest waterfall to enjoying a beer at a floating pub, Nanaimo, British Columbia, is home to many unique attractions. Whether it’s a stop on a road trip or a weekend destination, there’s no shortage of fun things to do in Nanaimo. 

Photo credit: Harbour Air Seaplanes

Here are some of the top things to do in Nanaimo for adventure seekers to coffee aficionados and everyone in-between.        

Indulge on the Nanaimo Bar Trail

You really can’t visit Nanaimo without having a Nanaimo bar. For namesake alone, one of the best things to do in Nanaimo, BC, is to eat your way around the city on the Nanaimo Bar Trail. With 39 stops on the route, you’ll find everything from the classics to more adventurous spins like Nanaimo bar gelato and cheesecake. There are even vegan and gluten-free options to indulge in as well. You can find the complete list of locations here.

Visit Newcastle Island (Saysutshun)

Newcastle Island, or Saysutshun as traditionally known by the Snuneymuxw people, is home to the beautiful Newcastle Island Marine Provincial Park. Visiting the island is one of the top Nanaimo attractions for hiking, bird watching, and camping. 

Shores of Newcastle Island

Catch the ferry from Maffeo Sutton Park and embark on a peaceful retreat to a place that has been special to the Snuneymuxw people for years. If you’re interested in camping in Nanaimo, the park is the perfect place. There are 18 tent campsites and options for boaters to tie on and enjoy an evening on the Salish Sea. 

Visiting the island is a summer activity, with the ferry operating daily from May to September. Campsites are available with a reservation or on a first-come-first-served basis for a small nightly fee of CAD $18 (USD $14).       

Hit the Beach at Pipers Lagoon Park

One of the best beaches in Nanaimo is at Pipers Lagoon. The waterfront park has many walking trails and driftwood-laden beaches perfect for a sunset stroll. Plan to visit at low tide and walk over to Shack Island, a small slice of land dotted with rustic fishing cabins. 

things to do in nanaimo
Pipers Lagoon

Float at the Dinghy Dock Pub

Take a short ferry ride to Protection Island from the Nanaimo Harbour on Front Street to visit Canada’s only floating pub! The Dinghy Dock is one of the most unique places to visit in Nanaimo. Grab some pub grub and enjoy the view of Vancouver Island from the water.

There’s often live music in the evening and stunning wildlife viewing from the patio. If the ferry isn’t your thing, you can even rent a kayak and paddle over from downtown. After your meal, take a stroll around Protection Island. You’ll find plenty of walking trails and rocky west coast beaches to explore.    

Discover The Abyss

One of the most interesting things to see in Nanaimo is the 50 cm (20”) crack in the earth, coined “The Abyss.” Although its origins are unclear, the fissure is a natural wonder along the Extensions Ridge Trail. The crack looks bottomless and is just big enough to fall into so be extra careful if hiking with a pup. 

Photo Credit: Tourism Vancouver Island / The Great Trail

 

Go for a Stroll at Neck Point Park

With its many impressive nature parks, there are lots of free things to do in Nanaimo. Visiting Neck Point is a favourite among tourists and locals alike. Lined by rocky bluffs and pebble beaches, the shores are known to be frequented by sea lions and orcas. 

Neck Point is also a hotspot for ocean divers. Nanaimo offers world-class diving opportunities, especially in the winter—with a thick wet suit, of course!

Have a Pint at a Local Brewery

With five local breweries in town, you’ll have no shortage of great places to grab a pint. Stop into White Sails Brewing for a Mount Benson IPA or to Longwood Brewery for an Island Time Lager. Plan your trip with the BC Ale Trail in mind to discover some of the best craft beers that Vancouver Island has to offer. Whether you’re craving the full taproom experience or prefer to take a growler to go, Nanaimo breweries have you covered.  

White Sails Brewery
things to do in nanaimo
A variety of beers at White Sails Brewery
Photo Credit: BC Ale Trail

Look for Fossils at Ammonite Falls

Venture down the 4.8 km (3 miles) trail to Ammonite Falls, where you’ll be surrounded by lush forest and ocean fossils. The main trail is a well-maintained walking path, opening up to a view of the cliffside falls at the end. 

If you’re feeling adventurous, climb down the steep rope-lined hill to the foot of the falls for an amazing view. The ropes are especially helpful when the trail gets muddy—which is often—so remember to wear good boots!

The falls are a great place to cool off in the summer that feels like a rainforest oasis. Walk along the riverbed and pay close attention to the rock-studded walls. You might just find an ammonite, which is an ocean fossil of an extinct mollusk.       

Ammonite Falls, Nanaimo

Take in the Views from Sugarloaf Mountain

Take a short climb up to Sugarloaf Mountain for a panoramic view of Departure Bay and the city of Nanaimo. Don’t be fooled by the unassuming street entrance, the rocky steps will lead you up to a spectacular lookout point. It’s the perfect spot to watch the ferries come in or catch a sunset in the evening.

things to do in nanaimo
Sugarloaf Mountain

Watch the Seals at Dodd Narrows

Check the tide charts and walk through Joan Point Park for a vantage point of Dodd Narrows. At high tide, this passage of narrows between Vancouver Island and Mudge Island puts on quite a show. Watch the rapids hit the coast and keep an eye out for seals playing in the currents.    

Have a Coffee at Regard Coffee Roasters

Regard Coffee Roasters is Nanaimo’s only local coffee roaster. If you’re looking for things to do in Nanaimo in winter or want to cozy up with a cup year-round, Regard is your spot. Have a seat in the bright and airy café or take a bag of freshly roasted beans home with you. If you like what you taste, you can sign up for their coffee subscription service and enjoy a taste of Nanaimo from anywhere in Canada!   

Regard Coffee

Soak in Canadian History at the Bastion

Deemed one of Nanaimo’s most iconic landmarks, the Bastion was built by Hudson’s Bay Company in the 1850s. Now maintained by the Nanaimo Museum, you can visit for summer tours to learn more about Island coal mining. If you plan your visit at midday, you can even catch a cannon firing!  

Grab Breakfast at The Vault Café

Brighten up a grey Vancouver Island day at the bright pink Vault Café. Have some of the best breakfast in Nanaimo while being surrounded by greenery and romantic architecture. The café is located in an old bank building where charming character is the backdrop for delicious food and live music.  

things to do in nanaimo
Vault Cafe

Watch the Bathtub Race

Without a doubt, the ultimate Nanaimo tourist attraction is the annual Bathtub Race. Annually hosted in July since 1967 (except for 2020, of course), hundreds of “tubbers” race motorized bathtub boats around the coastal islands for a chance at victory. The race originally went across the Strait from Nanaimo to Vancouver but has since been rerouted.

Statue of Frank Ney, creator of the Bathtub Race

Though things have changed over the years, former mayor Frank Ney is still an icon of the race. He used to dress up as a pirate and promote the race around the Island—what a way to put Nanaimo on the map! The race turns into a month-long festival with lots of activities and events across the city. If you’re bored of regular sports, be sure to visit Nanaimo in July and add a bathtub race to your agenda!  

Go on a Whale Watching Tour

The west coast of British Columbia is spoiled when it comes to majestic wildlife. Going on a whale watching tour is an awesome way to spend an afternoon and see marine life in action. Orcas, humpback whales, and seals are all residents of the Salish Sea that hugs Nanaimo’s coast.  

Going on a tour with Vancouver Island Whale Watch is a great way to explore the ocean sustainably. Tours only follow healthy growing whale populations instead of the endangered orcas commonly seen further south. Fares range from CAD $139-145 (USD $108-113) for a 4-hour tour, with a portion of that donated to marine conservation efforts. 

Blending the best parts of seaside and city living is what Nanaimo tourism is all about. From quirky sporting events to postcard-worthy views, Nanaimo boasts loads of activities to enjoy year-round. Come feel the salty air for yourself and experience the restaurants, waterfalls, and beaches that make Nanaimo a travel-worthy destination.   

Visited before? What was your favourite thing to do in Nanaimo, Vancouver Island?

 

About the Author:

Olivia D’Alessandro is a van dwelling traveler sharing stories and tips for life on the road on Generic Van Life. She is a freelance writer and graphic designer who has spent the last three years exploring North America by road in her vintage camper van, Clementine. She is currently living on Vancouver Island in beautiful British Columbia, Canada. Here, you can find her hiking, chopping wood, and hitting all the dirt roads that Google Maps doesn’t know about.

 

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