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If you’re hungry for a road trip full of beautiful beaches, outdoor adventure, and the freshest seafood around, the Eyre Peninsula is your ticket. This South Australia gem is framed by the Southern Ocean and boasts incredible scenery in every direction. 

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The pristine waters offer world-renowned seafood that pairs perfectly with a side of adventure. The Eyre Peninsula is the only place in Australia where you can cage dive with great white sharks in the morning and feast on oysters by the coast in the evening.       

Fishery Bay, Eyre Peninsula, South Australia           
Fishery Bay, Eyre Peninsula, South Australia 

On our half-lap around Australia, we’ve made our way around the rugged coastline and indulged in all that the Eyre Peninsula has to offer. Below you’ll find our must-see stops for a dreamy adventure on this underrated road trip. With endless postcard-worthy views, a journey around the Eyre Peninsula can’t be missed. 

What is Eyre Peninsula Known for?

Coined Australia’s seafood frontier, the Eyre Peninsula is known for abundant wildlife, incredible beaches and top-notch seafood. It’s also home to Port Lincoln National Park and Coffin Bay National Park, peaceful sheltered bays, and plenty of luxury accommodation options. The Eyre Peninsula hosts exciting wildlife opportunities like whale watching and shark cage diving. Seafood restaurants and holiday houses are never far away.  

What Towns are in the Eyre Peninsula?

The main towns on the Eyre Peninsula are Port Lincoln, Coffin Bay, Ceduna, and Whyalla. While these might be the most popular, there are lots of charming small towns scattered around the region that are well worth a visit.  

How Far is the Eyre Peninsula From Adelaide?

To reach the Eastern Eyre, it’s a 3.5 hour (300 km) drive from Adelaide to Port Augusta. But, the trip south to the Lower Eyre Peninsula is a bit of a longer journey. Prepare for a 7-8 hour drive from Adelaide to Port Lincoln. It’s a long to go in one go, so we definitely recommend breaking up the journey with a few great stops. 

There are three regional airports on the Eyre Peninsula. If you don’t have wheels, you can always fly in and rent a vehicle for your Eyre Peninsula road trip.  

Eyre Peninsula

What is There to do on the Eyre Peninsula?

Along with dining at fantastic seafood restaurants, the Eyre Peninsula hosts some of the most unique outdoor activities in South Australia. You can hop aboard a shark diving charter, swim with sea lions, and plunge into a rockpool all in one day! Not to mention all of the amazing Eyre Peninsula camping, beaches, sunset strolls on the beach, and panoramic views to discover.  

Our Suggested 2 Week Eyre Peninsula Road Trip Itinerary

Follow this 2 week itinerary along the coastline from the Eastern Eyre in Whyalla to the Western Eyre in Fowlers Bay (or vice versa). There are a number of spots that deserve a longer stay, you’ll see these noted in the recommendations below. 

Whyalla – 1-2 nights

There’s no better way to start your Eyre Peninsula road trip than to swim with giant cuttlefish in Whyalla. It’s a once-in-a-lifetime experience that you can do between the months of May and August. During this breeding season, hundreds of giant cuttlefish come to the bay around Whyalla and can be easily spotted right off shore. The waters are also teeming with other marine life so if you happen to jump in, keep your eyes peeled for massive snapper and dolphins swimming in the sunshine. 

Whyalla gets over 300 days of sun a year so it’s a beautiful area to spend a few days. 

Where to Stay in Whyalla: Camping by the foreshore at Point Lowly or Fitzgerald Bay is the best way to go if you are self sufficient. Camping fee is $10 per night/vehicle and amenities include toilets, showers, water, and a small kids playground. Alternatively, you’ll find a couple of hotels in town. 

Port Lincoln – 2-4 nights

As you make your way down the peninsula past Cowell and Tumby Bay, you’ll travel toward the tourism capital of the Eyre Peninsula – Port Lincoln. The town of Port Lincoln has lots of restaurants, some great wildlife experiences, and accommodation to suit every budget. 

Most famously known as the only place in Australia where you can cage dive with great white sharks, Port Lincoln is an adventure hub. 

Where to Stay in Port Lincoln: Stay at the Port Lincoln Tourist Park which offers campsites, cabins, and waterfront apartments. It’s close to all city amenities so you can have lunch at The Fresh Fish Place or check out the lively local wineries and breweries. 

For a more unique luxury accommodation, check our Tanonga Luxury Lodge, located just 30 mins out of town. It’s a beautiful eco-friendly property that will get you out of the hustle and busstle of Port Lincoln and into peaceful nature. 

READ NEXT: Things to do in Port Lincoln  

Lincoln National Park – 3-5 nights

Lincoln National Park is home to some of the most beautiful secluded beaches in all of South Australia. The park has stunning views of the Neptune Islands and great hikes leading to sweeping Eyre Peninsula panoramas. The park is also a popular spot for 4WD adventures, especially in the Memory Cove Wilderness Protection Area.  

We highly recommend spending at least 3 nights camping in the park at one of the many bush campgrounds. For us, camping at Memory Cove was a highlight, although the road to get there was definitely a very treacherous 4WD only track. D

Don’t forget to make a stop at Fishery Bay on your way out! It’s a favourite in the region with one of the nicest beaches on the Eyre Peninsula.  

Memory Cove, Port Lincoln National Park, Eyre Peninsula
Memory Cove, Port Lincoln National Park, Eyre Peninsula

Where to Stay in Lincoln National Park: The only option for accommodation in the park is bush camping with limited facilities. You’ll need to bring your own water and all food supplies. Campgrounds at Surfleet Cove, September Beach and Memory Cove (4WD only) were our favourites. 

Surfleet Campground, Lincoln National Park, Eyre Peninsula

Coffin Bay & Coffin Bay National Park – 3-5 nights

The Eyre Peninsula didn’t earn its reputation as the Seafood Frontier for nothing! If you’re in search of fresh oysters, look no further than Coffin Bay. The town hosts fantastic seafood & nature tours and shells out some of the tastiest oysters in the country. Once you’ve sampled a dozen (or two), head to Coffin Bay National Park to experience the stunning coastal wilderness.

Don’t miss a chance to go swimming or fishing at Almonta Beach and admire the spectacular ocean views from Point Avoid. 

Between the town and the National Park, you can easily spend 5 or more days in the area.  3 nights is the minimum you would need to explore the beaches and camp in the park. 

Oksana at Yangie Bay Campground

Where to Stay in Coffin Bay: There are a number of bush campgrounds scattered throughout the park.  Yangie Bay campground is the only spot suitable for 2WD vehicles or caravans, but there are several great spots for 4WD campers. We especially liked Black Springs, which has limited facilities and feels perfectly remote. 

Max relaxing on a hammock at the Black Springs Campground

Alternatively, you could stay in town and drive into the park for daily adventures. The town is only 20 mins away and has a few caravan parks and hotels. 

Eyre Peninsula National Parks: Coffin Bay

READ NEXT: Guide to Visiting Coffin Bay National Park

Cummings Monument – Day Stop

Make a day stop in Kiana for a rocky coastline that rivals the 12 Apostles of Great Ocean Road. The Cummings Monument has a gorgeous lookout offering views of the ocean and stark cliffs beneath. This dramatic viewpoint is a must-see on the Eyre Peninsula that’s perfect for a mid-morning picnic or to search for whales and dolphins.     

Greenly Beach & Rockpools – 1-2 Days

Bring your camera along as you explore picturesque Greenly Beach and its famous rock pools. The Eyre Peninsula has lots of lovely beaches but Greenly Beach is always a crowd favourite. You can spend an afternoon swimming or surfing on the beach and end the day with a soak in the natural rock pools.  

Greenly Beach, Eyre Peninsula 

Where to Stay at Greenly Beach: This spot is for self sufficient campers and caravans only, as there are no facilities at this beautiful wild campground. 

Locks Well Beach – Day Stop 

Make a pitstop at Locks Well Beach to marvel at the gorgeous coastline from the lookout. Head down the wooden steps to walk along the peaceful sandy beach that’s known to be a fishing hotspot. Drop a line and have a go at fishing for Australian salmon!

Clifftop Drive near Elliston – Day Stop

A scenic drive in the glow of the evening sunset is an Eyre Peninsula staple. There are two clifftop drives in Elliston that offer stunning views of the sea – Anxious Bay and Little Bay. Don’t forget your camera to capture shots of the unique sculptures like giant thongs and Easter Island heads that dot the coastline. And of course, look out for surfers or hop on a board yourself at the Black Fellows.

Sheringa Beach – 1 Day

Sheringa Beach is an awesome place to spend the night parked up beside massive sand dunes and crashing waves. It’s a self-sufficient site with drop toilets and waste bins so it’s great for tents and camper vans. Spend the day fishing for salmon or surfing the waves before settling in to camp under the stars. 

Oksana at Sheringa Beach

Where to Stay at Shering Beach: Camping at Sheringa Beach is $10 per night and facilities include flush toilets and a limited water source.

Talia & Woolshed Caves – Spend 1 night or Day Stop

The massive waves that hit this stunning coastline have carved out granite caverns right on the shore. The Woolshed Cave is known for its intricate honeycomb ceiling while The Tub makes for a hidden adventure to the sea. You’ll want to visit the caves at low tide so it’s a good excuse to spend the night.   

Talia Caves, Eyre Peninsula, South Australia

Where to Stay at Talia Caves: Talia Caves offers self-sufficient bush camping just across the road from the day car park. It’s a free camp with no facilities and no mobile reception, so come prepared if you plan on spending the night. 

Talia Caves, Eyre Peninsula, South Australia

Mount Camel Beach – Day stop or 1-2 nights

If you’re yet to squeeze in some Eyre Peninsula fishing, Mount Camel Beach will be calling your name. Known for excellent year-round surf fishing, the beach sees huge waves and unspoiled golden sands. Look out for sea lions and explore this wildlife-rich region on a day stop. 

Where to Stay at Mount Camel Beach: This area is home to a beautiful remote eco luxury lodge called the Camel Beach House. The lodge consists of xx self-sufficient cabins that offer stunning views of the coastline. Rates start at $xx 

Venus Bay – Needle Eye Lookout – Spend 1 night or Day Stop

Visitors come to Venus Bay in search of peaceful waters and gorgeous sunsets and don’t leave disappointed. Islands and rugged cliffs paint a magical view of the Eyre Peninsula. Spend the night at a powered beachfront campsite at the caravan park or make a day stop to look out at the Needle Eye. It’s a unique rock formation with a hole running through it that you can’t miss. 

Murphy’s Haystacks – Day Stop

Make a day stop at Murphy’s Haystacks to walk among huge rock pillars and boulders dating back millions of years! These unique wind-worn rocks are some of the oldest in Australia and make for a quintessential Eyre Peninsula photo. The giant pink granite boulders are a great backdrop for a picnic lunch. 

Murphy’s Haystacks, Eyre Peninsula 

Baird Bay – Day Stop

Baird Bay is one of the premier destinations in South Australia to swim with sea lions and dolphins. Join a tour to frolic in the water with the friendliest of sea lions. It’s a fun and unique experience worth doing! 

Point Labatt Sea Colony, Baird Bay, Eyre Peninsula, South Australia Image Credit: denisbin via flickr CC

After your tour, head to Point Labatt and walk along the viewing platform that overlooks the Point Labatt Sea Lion Colony. Here, you’ll catch a glimpse of the only native sea lions that live permanently on the Australian mainland. 

Westall Way Loop – Day Stop

This 32 km scenic coastal drive hugs the rocky shores of the western Eyre Peninsula and delivers on stunning ocean views. Follow the Westall Way Loop to Smooth Pool, where you can swim or snorkel in an ancient rock pool. The drive takes 2-3 hours with stops at Smooth Pool and Granites surf beach. 

Whistling Rocks – Cape Wondoma – Day Stop

Close your eyes and listen to the gentle whistle of wind whipping through holes in the eroded cliffs. Whistling Rocks are an interesting phenomenon on Cape Wondoma that create an almost eerie sensory experience. Head down the wooden boardwalk to the Blowhole and listen to the rocks whistle while seawater mists your face. 

Streaky Bay – Spend 1 night or Day Stop

Yet another oyster-worthy stop on the Seafood Frontier, Streaky Bay boasts fabulous beaches and mouth-watering seafood. There is not much to do in Streaky Bay itself, but eat and enjoy the nearby beaches, but the town makes for a nice overnight stop if you are not self sufficient in your camping/touring set up. 

Eyre Peninsula
Max having fish and chips at Streaky Bay

Where to Stay in Streaky Bay: We recommend spending a night if you can and waking up to the sparking Eyre Peninsula waters from Tractor Beach. You’ll have to be self-sufficient but there are toilets and striking views from every site.  

Alternatively, there is a caravan park in town and a couple of hotels as well. 

Perlubie Beach – 2-3 nights 

Eyre Peninsula beaches are known to be spectacular and Perlubie is no exception. The white sandy beach is hard-packed so it’s suitable for 2WD vehicles, but those with 4WD can explore even further. 

Eyre Peninsula
Oksana on a hammock at Perlubie Beach

Perlubie is quite unassuming but it’s the kind of place that you fall in love with as soon as you arrive here. Sunsets are magical, the beach is spectacular and little shaded cabinas on the beach make it a favourite spot for a few days or more of swimming, paddling, fishing, or just relaxing. 

Eyre Peninsula
Perlubie Beach, Eyre Peninsula

Where to Stay in Perlubie Beach: The low cost campground right on the beach was our favourite campsite on the peninsula! We recommend spending 2 or 3 nights at one of the self-sufficient sites. It’s a pretty popular spot for visitors and locals and has toilets, showers, and water. The campground has an honesty box where a $10 donation per night is suggested.   

Smoky Bay – Day Stop

Make a day stop in Smoky Bay and stretch your legs while looking out over crashing surf waves at St Mary’s Beach. You can head down to the jetty and buy some fresh oysters for lunch or spend the day walking the trails at Laura Bay Conservation Park. The peaceful sheltered bays offer excellent fishing and gorgeous scenery. 

Ceduna – Day Stop

As you make your way up the west coast of the Eyre Peninsula, make a day stop in the rugged beach town of Ceduna. Home to Oysterfest, the pristine waters are bursting with marine life. Eat oysters, go fishing, or just admire the beautiful Aboriginal art. Stop by the Ceduna Aboriginal Arts & Culture Centre to see vibrant local artwork and get a handmade souvenir to remember your visit. 

Eyre Peninsula
Things to do in Eyre Peninsula – Eyre Peninsula Tourism . Image Credit: Peter via Flickr CC

Fowlers Bay – Day Stop

What better way to end a road trip than with a whale watching tour in beautiful Fowlers Bay. Located on the northwest edge of the Eyre Peninsula, Fowlers Bay is a hotspot for whales migrating in the winter. You can book a tour or see them right from land as you’re fishing off the jetty or rolling around on the huge sand dunes

Eyre Peninsula
Sand Dunes at Fowlers Bay. Image Credit: Chris Guy via Flickr CC

No matter how many stops you can include in your Eyre Peninsula road trip or how many nights/weeks you can dedicate to this adventure, we hope that you’ll fall in love with the region as quickly as we did! 

What are your favourite stops on the Eyre Peninsula in South Australia? 

 

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